Bringing Telemedicine to the CF Clinic: A Success Story

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

No-contact telemedicine to better protect CF clinic patients and staff during this pandemic may sound like a great idea, but is it even possible to institute? In this eCysticFibrosis Review Special Edition podcast, we find out how pulmonary and critical care specialists Dr. Dana Albon and Dr. Lindsay Somerville successfully brought telemedicine to their Adult Cystic Fibrosis Clinic at University of Virginia Health.

In the Clinic: Triple Combination CFTR Modulation

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

Elexacaftor/tezacaftor/ivacaftor — the newly approved triple combination CFTR modulator therapy.  What are the benefits?  For which patients?  What are the potential adverse effects?  Who’s most likely to receive them?  

In this issue, Dr. Scott Sagel from the Breathing Institute at the Children’s Hospital Colorado, part of the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus, takes us to the clinic to discuss some answers. 

Addressing Mental Health in CF

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

Anxiety and depression in cystic fibrosis — who do these conditions affect? How much do they influence patient health? How can clinicians identify and manage them? What evidence-based interventions have been shown to work?

In this issue, Dr. Anna Georgiopoulos, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Part-Time, Harvard Medical School and Consulting Psychiatrist, Massachusetts General Hospital Cystic Fibrosis Program, takes us to the clinic to answer these questions that can be key to the health and well-being of children, adults, and families living with CF.

Clinical Considerations: New Anti-Inflammatories & New CFTR Modulators

New CFTR modulators for F508del mutations? New research into reducing inflammation in the CF lung?  In this issue, Dr. Jennifer Taylor-Cousar from National Jewish Health in Denver explains the potential clinical impact of new and emerging CF disease modifying therapies.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

Continuous Alternating Therapies: A Clinical Perspective

Volume 8, Issue 11.

In this issue:

Inhaled antibiotics have become the foundation of treating chronic respiratory tract Pseudomonas infection in individuals with cystic fibrosis. But what happens when inhaled monotherapy doesn’t sufficiently manage the symptoms? Which patients are appropriate candidates for treatment with multiple inhaled agents?  Which medications are appropriate for continuous alternating therapy (CAT)?

In this Issue, Dr. Elliott Dasenbrook from the Cleveland Clinic brings the evidence he analyzed in his recent eCysticFibrosis Review Newsletter issue (Vol 8; Issue 10) into the clinic to help guide clinical decision-making.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

In The Clinic: CFTR Modification & Nutritional Deficiencies

Volume 8, Issue 9.

In this issue:

The effects of CFTR modifiers on improving lung function in people with cystic fibrosis are well known. But what about their effects on the GI tract that directly affect nutrition?

In this issue, Dr. Michael Wilschanski — Director of Hadassah Hospital’s Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit at Hebrew University in Jerusalem — explains how new findings about CFTR modification can impact clinical practice.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

Clinical Insight: CFTR Modulators

Volume 8, Issue 6.

In this issue, Dr. Gregory Sawicki — Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Cystic Fibrosis Center at Boston Children’s Hospital — discusses how the recent findings about the real-world use of CFTR modulators can impact clinical practice.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

Clinical Approaches to MDR Lung Infections

Volume 8, Issue 4.

Multidrug resistant lung infections present an increasingly common and increasingly dangerous threat to all individuals with cystic fibrosis.  Common CF pathogens — Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia — are all showing increasing resistance to clinicians’ usual antibiotic armamentarium.

In this issue, Dr. Claire Elson, from the University of Missouri Kansas City School of Pharmacy, and Dr. Christopher Oermann, from the UMKC School of Medicine, describe strategies for the clinical management of these resistant infections.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

Lung Transplant and CRC Screening

Volume 8, Issue 2.

Screening to avoid the morbidity and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with CF, with the incidence of CRC rising, has become an increasingly important challenge, particularly among lung transplant patients.  But how and when should patients be screened? With colonoscopy or non-invasive FIT? Before or after transplant?  Are there patients who should not be screened, and why?

In this issue, Dr. Denis Hadjiliadis from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania discusses the clinical aspects of screening patients with CF to prevent CRC.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

CFTR Modulators: Clinical Insights

Volume 7, Issue 12.

In this podcast Dr. John P. Clancy reviews CFTR modulators, and discusses insights presented at the 2017 NACFC.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits:
Physician post-test
Nurse post-test

To read a companion newsletter click here.