Clinical Markers for MS Diagnosis and Prognosis

Volume 2, Issue 2

The central vein sign. Optical coherence tomography. Serum neurofilament light chain. New research has identified these markers as valuable in discriminating MS from mimicking conditions, and in predicting future disability.

In this Issue, Dr. Michael Kornberg and Dr. Elias Sotirchos from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine discuss how these advances can impact clinical decision-making to provide better patient care.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

Clinical Challenges of Engaging PWID and MSM in HIV Care

Volume 4, Issue 6.

Linking high-risk populations like PWIDs (people who inject drugs) and MSM (men who have sex with men) to effective HIV care requires overcoming complex barriers unique to these groups.

In this issue, two of the directors from Boston’s Health Care for the Homeless Program, Dr. Jennifer Brody, Director of HIV Services and ANP Marguerite Beiser, Director of HCV Services, discuss the clinical aspects of addressing these challenges.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.


Clinical Approaches to MDR Lung Infections

Volume 8, Issue 4.

Multidrug resistant lung infections present an increasingly common and increasingly dangerous threat to all individuals with cystic fibrosis.  Common CF pathogens — Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia — are all showing increasing resistance to clinicians’ usual antibiotic armamentarium.

In this issue, Dr. Claire Elson, from the University of Missouri Kansas City School of Pharmacy, and Dr. Christopher Oermann, from the UMKC School of Medicine, describe strategies for the clinical management of these resistant infections.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

In the Clinic: ART and Metabolic Effects

Volume 4, Issue 4.

The incidence of the metabolic complications common in people with HIV infection — bone disease, weight gain, cardiovascular disease, and liver disease — is increasing as improved antiretroviral therapies create longer lifespans.

In this issue, Dr. Suman Srinivasa and nurse practitioner Kathleen Fitch from Harvard Medical School discuss how to identify and manage these metabolic complications to help improve outcomes and quality of life in patients living with HIV.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

Lung Transplant and CRC Screening

Volume 8, Issue 2.

Screening to avoid the morbidity and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with CF, with the incidence of CRC rising, has become an increasingly important challenge, particularly among lung transplant patients.  But how and when should patients be screened? With colonoscopy or non-invasive FIT? Before or after transplant?  Are there patients who should not be screened, and why?

In this issue, Dr. Denis Hadjiliadis from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania discusses the clinical aspects of screening patients with CF to prevent CRC.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

New ART Agents: A Clinical Perspective

Volume 4, Issue 2.

Recently approved treatment options and new antiviral therapies still under investigation — through case-based discussion, Dr. Ethel Weld from the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine explains how the promise of these new agents can impact current clinical practice.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

In The Clinic: Improving Outcomes in At-Risk Populations

Volume 3, Issue 8.

In this podcast Drs. Allison Agwu evaluates the specific barriers to testing and entering into care among transsexual individuals, migrant and immigrant populations, and adolescents.

Take our post-test to claim CME credits.

To read a companion newsletter click here.

START HCV: Part 2

Hep C (HCV) treatment is easier and more effective, than ever. Cure is almost always expected when treated—even current drug users—so learn how you can cure HCV and help prevent re-infection, liver damage, cancer and death. Take the post-test to claim your credit.