Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

Volume 1, Issue 10.

Our guest author is Mark Sulkowski, MD, Professor of Medicine, Medical Director of the Viral Hepatitis Center, Division of Infectious Diseases and Gastroenterology/Hepatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland.

Bone Health, Vitamin D, and HIV

Volume 1, Issue 6.

Dr. Todd Brown, Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will explain the management of an HIV-infected person with osteoporosis, and discuss the controversies surrounding vitamin D screening and treatment.

HCV/HIV Coinfection

Volume 2, Issue 8.

Dr. Mark Sulkowski, Professor and Medical Director of the Viral Hepatitis Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will describe the epidemiology of HCV infection in HIV-infected persons including the role of sexual transmission of HCV.

Featured Cases: Emerging Pathogens in Cystic Fibrosis

Volume 3, Issue 12.

Case studies offer opportunity to differentiate the needs of each patient when managing respiratory infections. Dr. Elliott Dasenbrook will review the prevalence of important CF organisms over the last 10 years, the impact of respiratory tract MRSA on survival, the association between a virulent strain of P. aeruginosa that can spread among patients and lung transplant or death, as well as the impact of chronic non-tuberculous Mycobacterial lung disease on lung function.

Screening and Management of Older Patients with HIV

Volume 1, Issue 2.

Dr. Kelly Gebo, Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Unviersity School of Medicine will discuss the screening of older patients for HIV risk factors. She will also explain the issues of polypharmacy in older HIV infected patients.

Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection

Volume 2, Issue 6.

Dr. Kennenth Sherman, Gould Professor of Medicine and Director of the Division of Digestive Disease at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine will diferentiate how occult HBV differs from classical HBV infections.