“U=U” — Clinical Considerations

Volume 4, Issue 12

“U=U” — an Undetectable HIV viral load means Untransmittable HIV virus.  In her recent eHIV Newsletter Issue (Vol. 4; No. 11), Dr. Jill Blumenthal from the Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health at the University of California San Diego analyzed the current evidence strongly supporting this concept.  In this Podcast, she discusses “U=U” from the clinical perspective, and models how it can help promote patient safety.

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In Clinical Practice: Overcoming Patient Barriers to PrEP

Volume 1, Issue 2

In this issue:

PrEP — pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV transmission — is safe, it’s effective, and it’s significantly underused in the U.S.  One key barrier to increased PrEP use is a lack of awareness and acceptance among the patient populations most at-risk for new HIV infection.

In this podcast, Dr. Douglas Krakower from Harvard Medical School takes us into the exam room to translate the new information in his Newsletter Issue into clinical practice.

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Clinical Aspects of Improving ART Adherence

Volume 4, Issue 10

In this Issue, Dr. Joyce Jones from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Dr. Barbara Taylor from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio analyze recent publications describing evidence-based ART adherence interventions and how they can be tailored to specific situations to increase effectiveness.

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Clinical Perspective: New AEs from Newer ART

Volume 4, Issue 8

While newer antiviral agents like darunavir and the integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) dolutegravir have shown great efficacy, recent postmarketing surveillance has identified important adverse effects not found in the clinical trial populations.

In this issue, Dr. Cody Chastain from the Division of Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center discusses how these new findings can impact the clinical use of these new agents.

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Clinical Challenges of Engaging PWID and MSM in HIV Care

Volume 4, Issue 6.

Linking high-risk populations like PWIDs (people who inject drugs) and MSM (men who have sex with men) to effective HIV care requires overcoming complex barriers unique to these groups.

In this issue, two of the directors from Boston’s Health Care for the Homeless Program, Dr. Jennifer Brody, Director of HIV Services and ANP Marguerite Beiser, Director of HCV Services, discuss the clinical aspects of addressing these challenges.

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In the Clinic: ART and Metabolic Effects

Volume 4, Issue 4.

The incidence of the metabolic complications common in people with HIV infection — bone disease, weight gain, cardiovascular disease, and liver disease — is increasing as improved antiretroviral therapies create longer lifespans.

In this issue, Dr. Suman Srinivasa and nurse practitioner Kathleen Fitch from Harvard Medical School discuss how to identify and manage these metabolic complications to help improve outcomes and quality of life in patients living with HIV.

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New ART Agents: A Clinical Perspective

Volume 4, Issue 2.

Recently approved treatment options and new antiviral therapies still under investigation — through case-based discussion, Dr. Ethel Weld from the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine explains how the promise of these new agents can impact current clinical practice.

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In The Clinic: Improving Outcomes in At-Risk Populations

Volume 3, Issue 8.

In this podcast Drs. Allison Agwu evaluates the specific barriers to testing and entering into care among transsexual individuals, migrant and immigrant populations, and adolescents.

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START HIV: Part 2

Treatments for HIV are highly effective, but only when they are taken by those who need them. Learn about strategies to improve adherence and the importance of collaborative care. Do your part to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV. Take the post-test to claim your credit.

START HIV: Part 1

HIV infection can be stopped in its tracks. Learn the importance of screening for the virus and how to overcome barriers that get in your way. You can help prevent the spread of HIV and the illness that it brings. Take the post-test to claim your credit.